Frequently Asked Questions

Everything that you need to know about RVSM Monitoring

  1. What is monitoring?
  2. Is monitoring required?
  3. What do the new Long Term Monitoring Requirements Mean for my Operations?
  4. When should I get my aircraft monitored?
  5. How can I get my aircraft monitored?
  6. Are ground-based monitoring systems available in North America?
  7. How much does an EGMU monitoring flight cost?
  8. How do I schedule an EGMU monitoring flight?
  9. How much lead time do I need to schedule an EGMU monitoring flight?
  10. How much time does it take to conduct an EGMU monitoring flight?
  11. What is required to conduct an EGMU monitoring flight?
  12. How long will it take to get the results of my EGMU monitoring flight?
     

For specific questions or additional information please contact a RVSM Team Member.



1. What is Monitoring?
Monitoring supports the safety assessment and safety oversight function that is required with RVSM implementation.

2. Is monitoring required?
Yes, an operator must meet the minimum monitoring requirements established by its State authority to maintain their RVSM approval status.

3. What do the new Long Term Monitoring Requirements mean to my operations?
In order to maintain RVSM approval status, all aircraft approved for RVSM operations must complete an RVSM monitoring flight every two (2) years or 1,000 flight hours (whichever period is longer).

4. When should I get my aircraft monitored?
Operators that have been issued an US RVSM authorization will be required to conduct initial monitoring within six months of date of issue and must conduct monitoring every two years or 1,000 flight hours per aircraft, whichever period is longer.

5. How can I get my aircraft monitored?
Aircraft can be monitored for RVSM by scheduling an EGMU flight or by overflying a ground-based monitoring station. Aircraft not equipped with a Mode S transponder must complete an EGMU monitoring flight.

6. Are ground-based monitoring systems available in North America?
Yes, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and NAV CANADA have deployed ground-based monitoring systems in the United States and Canada.

7. How much does an EGMU monitoring flight cost?
The cost of an EGMU monitoring flight varies depending on factors which include monitoring location and technician time. Generally, the cost for one aircraft is approximately $2,100 plus travel costs if travel to monitoring location is required. CSSI makes every effort to minimize the cost of monitoring for the operator and offers several monitoring options.

8. How do I schedule an EGMU monitoring flight?
To schedule a EGMU monitoring flight contact the CSSI RVSM Operations Coordinator at monitor@cssiinc.com or call 866 GMU-8111 or 202 554-1050.

9. How much lead time do I need to schedule an EGMU monitoring flight?
Typically a monitoring flight can be scheduled within as little as 24 hours notice from the date of request.

10. How much time does it take to conduct an EGMU monitoring flight?
A typical monitoring flight should take no more than two hours and consists of the following: the monitoring technician will temporarily set up the EGMU in your aircraft (this takes approximately 15 minutes); the technician needs to collect approximately 30 minutes of data at straight and level flight within RVSM airspace (FL290-410).

11. What is required to conduct an EGMU monitoring flight?
The basic requirements to conduct a monitoring flight are:

  • 30 minutes of straight and level flight at FL290-410 inclusive
    • Aircraft Must have unobstructed window access (cabin or flight deck) for EGMU GPS antenna mounting. GPS Antennas are temporarily mounted on the inside of window(s) with suction cups.
  • Pre-flight access to cabin to setup EGMU and obtain Satellite Signal approximately 15 minutes prior to taxi to set up equipment)
  • Limited access to flight crew by monitoring technician for transponder code changes and flight information


12. How long will it take to get the results of my EGMU monitoring flight?
CSSI completes the initial processing of the data collected during a monitoring flight typically within two (2) business days. Once the data is processed at CSSI, it is forwarded to the FAA for final altimetry system error (ASE) calculation. The FAA typically completes final ASE calculation within 10 business days of the monitoring flight. CSSI has an approved memo notification process to notify the operators of the status of their data thoughout the entire GMS process. Upon completion of the final ASE results, for US registered aircraft the FAA will update the US RVSM approvals page with the date of your last successful RVSM monitoring flight; for Non-US registered aircraft the FAA will provide the results of the successful monitoring flight to the operator’s State authority.
 

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